Tag Archives: Mida Creek

Fisheries conservation and A Rocha Kenya

Many communities around Mwamba, our field studies centre in Watamu, are dependent to a large extent on fishing for food and income. So, over the past several months, we on the marine team have been working to learn if, and how, it may be worthwhile for A Rocha Kenya to become more involved in coastal fisheries conservation in the Watamu area. To this end, we have been reviewing the published scientific literature regarding Kenya’s coastal fisheries, meeting with larger-scale Kenya fisheries agencies, and talking with local fishers and organizations in the Watamu area. Combined with our continuing coral reef and rockpool ecology research, this work with local fishermen and women may be an incredible way to both learn more about God’s amazing marine creation and work to redeem the way we as people relate to this part of His world.

Stay tuned for further updates as we continue to think and pray about this new potential project!

_PWS8601 A fisherman walking across the mud flats to his boat at Mida Creek

_PWS8641 Digging for bait

DCIM100GOPRO Returning from fishing in Mida Creek

GOPR0146-3 One days catch

Mida Creek Bird Club is born… & meets an elephant in Arabuko-Sokoke

A couple of weeks ago, I was at our community project at Mida – the 260m-long suspended walkway through the mangroves, and was approached by Juma who has become one of the main bird guides there for visitors who told me that a bunch of the youth there had got together and formed themselves into the “Mida Creek Bird Club” with a view of doing lots of birding and other bird-related conservation activities. He is chairman and promptly showed me their 10-page constitution and talked of their ideas which included a monthly bird walk on the first Saturday of the month somewhere in the local vicinity – the first one being planned for inside Arabuko-Sokoke Forest on 4th August (yesterday)… and could I be their guide?

So early on Saturday morning I picked up volunteers Martin (from Nairobi) and Brian (an ASSETS graduate from Dida to the west of Arabuko-Sokoke) and headed for the Mida entrance to the forest via Kenya Forest Service (KFS) to collect the key for the barrier. KFS have got an excellent understanding regarding community members and encouraging them in conservation of forests by working with them and had given permission for the group to enter the forest for no payment. An African Goshawk was calling (can’t reall call the “chip! chip! chip!” sound they make a song…) high overhead and the first bird singing otherwise was the ubiquitous Red-capped Robin Chat from the bush next to the forest station. On arriving at Mida there were just six members of the Bird Club waiting – but as we turned into the forest a seventh ran to catch up and after we had stopped at the first spot about 1km in three bajajis (motorbike taxis) turned up with another six so that in the end we were quite a healthy sized group! Most of the group had not done a lot of birding before and even more had done any forest birding so everything was new for them. We were on the look out for the stunning Peter’s Twinspot which is often on the track as you enter the forest… and sure enough, 700m in there was a pair doing their stuff feeding on grass seeds out in the open in front of us. A great start! We stopped at that point for a good 20 minutes as there was a feeding party of birds in the mixed forest around there and we added coastal specialities such as Little Yellow Flycatcher & Fischer’s Turaco to the list before moving on a few 100m to stop again to listen.

We were all 15 of us out of the pick-up and starting to walk along the track when without any warning a hunking great bull elephant stepped out of the forest and onto the track about 100m ahead of us… and started walking down the track straight towards us!! There was a moments panic among the group but we stood and marvelled at such an awesome sight! It hadn’t seen or smelt us as we were down wind of it and it just kept on coming straight at us – until it was about 60m off and I thought I’d better warn it of us being here and waved my arms and shouted at which point it wheeled around and vanished into the forest to the left! A really awesome sight and a huge treat for everyone.

Here’s the guy on the road… and see the video clip at the end as well!!

After that there was a bit of nervousness about any noise coming from the forest on the left but otherwise it was down to some serious birding and pointing out the various bird calls we could hear. A little further down the track is a spot I know for an East Coast Akalat territory… and sure enough within a minute of arriving there, he started singing though kept deep in the forest and didn’t show. We then moved on to the Brachtstegia woodland habitat which lies beyond the Mixed Forest habitat along the Mida track and which is a beautiful habitat for birding and walking. Brachystegia is known further south in Africa as ‘Miombo woodland’ and we are basically located in the northernmost extent of the habitat in Africa. It’s also the habitat for our endemic Clarke’s Weaver – though we didn’t see any this time but did catch up with Pale Batis, Chestnut-fronted Helmetshrike, Mombasa Woodpecker and Black-headed Apalis among others.

The group were hugely enthusiastic about the excursion and to add to the events of the day as we drove back to Mida Creek itself to drop everyone off, there was a Golden Pipit on the edge of the vlei you drive past down to the creek’s edge. My first here though the Mida guides had said one had been around in recent times.

As the club is still starting out, A Rocha Kenya is committing to helping them grow and strengthen – the first part of which is to give them some organisational training and capacity building on issues such as setting up a simple but robust financial system, how to run committee meetings etc. The finances in particular is something which countless small community groups (and even larger NGOs etc!) have fallen apart and collapsed over when not run transparently and properly and it’s a privilege to be in a position where we can contribute and help a group like this one become strong and effective.
Eastern Green

 Elephant in Arabuko-Sokoke video:

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Busy week for birds in Watamu & Arabuko-Sokoke Forest

Last week was a very busy week for the Research and Monitoring staff and volunteers. On Monday morning, we went to Sabaki for a shorebird, gull, and tern count. Sabaki town is at the delta of the Sabaki River (which is also the Galana River in Tsavo East, and starts in Nairobi as the Athi River). There were five birds of prey flying around over the roosting waders and terns, including Marsh Harrier, Mantague’s Harrier, Black Kite, and two Peregrine Falcons. Unfortunately, they were scaring up all the birds we wanted to count, so instead we practiced our identification skills.The falcons were very impressive to watch as they swooped down from great height to catch a bird, but each time we watched this, no bird was caught.  On our way back to the vehicle, we saw two hippos playing in the surf at the very point where the river becomes the ocean.

Hippos playing in the surf

Colin mentioned that the delta has changed quite a lot in the last few years, with much less sticky mud, and mangroves starting to fill in where the water used to come up to. There are probably two reasons that these changes are occurring. One is that poor farming practices up river are causing a lot of erosion, which makes for a greater sediment load in the river, and then much more settling occurring at the delta. Secondly, there are a number of wells that have been drilled to pull water out of the river, and supply water to all of Malindi, Watamu, and the surrounding areas. To me, the habitat at the delta seems great for shorebirds, but I wonder what these changes will bring in the near and distant future.

On Tuesday afternoon and evening, we prepared for banding birds in the Arabuko-Sokoke Forest, the largest remnant dry coastal forest in eastern Africa. This forest supports many endangered species, one of which is the East Coast Akalat, a small robin, which is on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (www.iucn.org) Red List, indicating that it is critically endangered. With a group of college students visiting from Washington State, USA, we set up 11 18-m mist nets in three runs, ready to be opened early the next morning.

On Wednesday and Thursday mornings, we banded four new akalats, and recaptured two, one from 2010 and one from 2008. Andrew, Colin’s research staff person, who has been here for about  five months as an official employee and was here previously as a volunteer, has never even seen the East Coast Akalat (he was in Nairobi for our two banding sessions), and I got to help band them! This was very exciting for me. We also banded four new Fischer’s Greenbuls, three new Tiny Greenbuls, four new Eastern Bearded Scrub Robins, four new Forest Batis, and one new Grey-backed Camaroptera.We were also lucky to catch a Crested Guineafowl, the first one that Colin has banded, on our first morning. Our total count was 30 birds.

Finally, on Friday morning (i.e., 3:oo am), we were up and out to the beach setting nets to catch waders. When the tide is high, a lot of the smaller waders, like Greater and Lesser Sandplovers, leave Mida Creek and come to roost on the beach in front of Mwamba. When the high tide is overnight, we can set up our nets in the dark and catch the birds to ring them, because they can’t see the nets and will fly into them. When we were setting up the nets, there were very few birds around us, so Colin went down the beach towards Garoda, and “twinkled” the birds toward the nets. At the end of the morning (i.e., 8:00 am), we had caught 20 birds, with eight of them being retraps.

Ringing waders at Mwamba

It was a great week for the R+M staff here at A Rocha, with lots of field work and birds-in-hand. As a volunteer leaving in early April, I look forward to all opportunities to get into the field and learn about Kenyan wildlife and culture.

Post written by Maggi Sliwinski, a volunteer from New York, USA.

Ngulia 2011 – ringers arrive in rain and set up ready for migrants

Thursday night saw us back at Mida Creek for another wader ringing session – two nights in fact, Thurs & Friday (which was last night…) before coming up to Ngulia today to start the migrant passerine ringing project for 2011. This time at Mida we had very helpful assistance from Niko and his team (Monika, Jan and Franziska) together with volunteers John (from Kinangop – Rift Valley) and Josephat (from Voi Tourism Training College). Niko had come with some outrageous 30m wader nets and so we set up 324m of net and sat back for the action. There was a lot of rain around and threat of wind as well but God was awesome and we had a dry two nights and wind dropped to very little.

A total of 159 birds were caught over the two nights, with quite different composition from one to the other – a good number of Grey Plovers the first night and only one Crab-plover, a few Terek Sandpipers and sand plovers, and on the second night 11 Crab-plovers, two Whimbrel, only 2 Tereks – and no Curlew Sandpipers the second night. In fact numbers for this latter species have really seemed to reduce in our catches – something worth looking further into…

 Andrew attaching colour flag to Lesser Sand Plover

Results for the 2 nights were as follows:

   

17-Nov

18-Nov

 

 

Species

 

New

Rtrp

New

Rtrp

Total rg’d

Total caught

Crab-plover

Dromas ardeola

1

0

10

0

11

11

Ringed Plover

Charadrius hiaticula

0

1

0

0

0

1

White-fronted Plover

Charadrius marginatus

0

0

0

0

0

0

Lesser Sandplover

C. mongolus

10

4

10

3

20

27

Greater Sandplover

C. leschenaultii

18

4

13

1

31

36

Grey Plover

Pluvialis squatarola

5

2

2

0

7

9

Little Stint 

Calidris minuta

30

2

11

0

41

43

Curlew Sandpiper

C. ferruginea

5

6

0

0

5

11

Whimbrel

Numenius phaeopus

0

0

2

0

2

2

Common Greenshank 

Tringa nebularia

0

0

0

0

0

0

Wood Sandpiper

Tringa glareola

0

0

0

0

0

0

Terek Sandpiper

Xenus cinereus

11

1

2

0

13

14

Saunders’ Tern

Sterna saundersii

1

0

1

0

2

2

Common Tern

S. hirundo

3

0

4

0

7

7

Total

 

84

20

55

4

139

163

So it was a very successful couple of nights wader ringing – and all sand plovers and Terek Sandpipers now are sporting a gaudy coloured flag with inscription on them in the hope we’ll get some recoveries of sighted birds elsewhere. Franziska also colour-ringed the Grey Plovers we caught as part of her studies back in Germany – and she promptly saw one of Thursday night’s birds on Friday foraging on the reef at low tide off Ocean Sports c.4km from where we ringed it…

  Common Tern

But back to Ngulia.. we left this morning eventually at 8am, somewhat bleary-eyed after a 2:30am return from the waders, but being ably driven by James in his minibus and by 3pm were in Mtito Andei. KWS at the gate gave us a great welcome and were hugely helpful in letting us in with the letter we had from HQ – thank you again to KWS for that assistance. 

The park is really green and there had been a really heavy storm come through just ahead of us as the road was very wet and pretty slick. We had several sightings of elephant on the way and a family of giraffe were keeping their feet dry on the road rather than in the wet grass – so it seemed – and which were greeted with glee by our German visitors.

Bird-wise there were not that many migrants – c.6 Eurasian Rock Thrush were nice to see and a flock of c.50 Amur Falcons as well. Next to no Barn Swallows were seen and just one Euro Roller. 

At the lodge we met David, Ian, Richard and Julia having arrived only some 20mins ahead in our ‘Blue Crane’ – ancient Nissan Sunny which used to be Graeme Backhursts before we bought it off him… They had a puncture in the circle just outside reception – and the spare it turned out was also without air…! An answer to prayer that it happened at the lodge and not in the middle of the park!! (and I tell you – the age of that car… I was totally praying they’d arrive safely!). As the generator was off, we used a hand pump to inflate the spare enough to move the car out of the way of other cars…

We took time in finding Chege to open the store to access our gear eventually managed and had the main ‘L’ of nets in the bush up and ready for the morning before the leopard bait was put up for the big cat. He came early this time – immediately after the meat was tied to the tree and even before the waiter was off the lawn, the leopard was on the bait and entertaining the punters.Good news – means we can put the nets when we want without fearing putting off the leopard for the tourists.

 

During dinner a solid rain storm moved in and has been raining on and off for 2-3 hours now including quite thick mist… but next to no birds at all, which is very bizarre. It is easing now as I tap but the mist has also lifted. Ian is stopping ‘on guard’ as it were for the mist arriving. The rest have hit the sack… which I’m going to do likewise with to try and catch up on that which I’ve missed over the past 3 nights.

Some pics from the day….

 mist at dinner – and it was raining hard.. but no birds

 David watching the mist – I guess the ‘not’ was cut off in the photo??!

 David & Ian not very impressed with the lack of birds in the mist.

Waders leaving Mida Creek for breeding grounds in Asia

Friday morning saw a somewhat bleary-eyed and hilarious group of A Rocha Kenya staff and volunteers return from another all-nighter on Mida Creek catching and ringing waders – or doing our best to, at least! We’ve been focussing on trying to ring waders (shorebirds) at Mida over the past few months in particular the past 4-6 weeks to try and get data on the weights of birds and their moult patterns in the build up to them departing on migration back to their breeding grounds in Asia and eastern Europe. 

This is one of the most interesting times of the bird calendar in terms of these birds. They have just spent possibly even nine months in Kenya after the last breeding season hanging out on Mida where life is pretty easy for a wader – warm conditions so no cold to fight, not many predators to worry about just a bit of disturbance from fishermen and tourists. As a result they don’t need to feed too heavily nor carry much fat to survive any potential harsh conditions – unlike their cousins who are wintering in Europe where a cold spell can come in and freeze their food source and can lead to death if you’re not fat enough to live it out till a thaw comes in.

However at this time of the year, March-May, birds are frantically foraging to fatten for the 6,7 or even 10,000km journey that they’ll be making back to their breeding grounds in Asia. This means as we catch them for ringing and weigh them, over this period you can see the weights of the birds increasing steadily and then numbers of adults suddenly start to reduce as adults leave for the north while mostly the youngsters from last year’s season stay behind and probably won’t migrate but will chill til next year when they’ll head home to join the fray of trying and find a territory and a mate to raise a family.

Moult-wise, it is also interesting. Adults have all completed their non-breeding season wing moult and have fresh, new, strong feathers to take them back to Asia and bring them back to Mida in August. Young birds, depending on the species and the population, will either have simply retained the feathers they grew in the nest last year, or will be moulting some in preparation for the next year spent in the harsh sunlight of the tropics which bleaches feathers like crazy and wears them out fast. 

The other neat thing to see is to go to Mida in the evening in early May and watch for flocks of birds that are setting off for Asia. We did that not long ago – headed out about 6pm with the tide low and birds spread all over foraging away. There was already a clear reduction in the numbers of birds around but still there were adults in 70-90% breeding plumage who would be heading north at any point. At about 6:15pm a flock of c.40 very handsome Curlew Sandpipers in their brick-red breeding plumage landed about 60m from us calling excitedly and looking alert. They only were there a few minutes before they took off trilling loudly and started climbing higher calling as they went. They climbed steadily heading off across the water and then started circling whilst still climbing making 2 or 3 circuits still calling quite clearly. After the last circuit they then adjusted their bearings and headed off just east of north still climbing as they went and flew on and on until they were out of sight. 

Amazing to think that within a matter of hours they would be over Somalia and only a couple of days easily beyond the Middle East. Below is a photo of a Curlew Sandpiper on its nest in its lovely plumage. Then a few images of one of our recent wader nights..

 by Benjo Cowburn

Rings & equipment with Crab-plover behind by Benjo Cowburn

Lesser Sand Plover wearing it's shiny ring

The morning after at Mida Creek...

Images from wader ringing on Mida Creek

I’ve just been sent a link to some images taken by Jane Del Ser who was with us on our August wader night on Mida Creek which give a good flavour of the night’s activities – thanks to Jane for sending us these!

We didn’t get a huge number of birds that night, but it was very useful data as we know very little about the weights and moult of birds at that time of the year.

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Environmental Education at Mida Creek

My name is Paul Graham, I am from the UK and volunteering with ARK for three weeks this summer. I am very happy to be here learning and getting involved with the work that ARK does in the local area.

Today I went along to Mida Creek, around a 20 minute taxi drive from the A Rocha Site Mwamba. I observed one of the education programmes run by ARK in this area. The programme gave the chance for a group of students, some from a local primary and the others from a local secondary school to learn more about the diverse wildlife at Mida Creek. To begin with the students sat down and were welcomed by the programme leader Tsofa, an A Rocha worker. He started by discussing with the students the ecosystem and the use of food webs and chains. By doing this, hoping to explain the relationship between the different organisms in Mida Creek and showing the students how these relationships can be visualized.

Tsofa drawing an example of a food web

After this discussion had finished and the students had taken notes, they were taken out into the creek by guides to study the organisms. The main focus was to learn about the different species of mangroves and seabirds. The guides were extremely knowledgeable of the area, answering the questions of the students and showing a great passion about the environment and the wildlife. Eight of the nine species of Mangrove found in Kenya grow in Mida Creek and are used by humans for firewood as well as for traditional medicine. They are also very useful to the local environment as their roots take in salts from the sea water in order to keep the land fertile.

at various points around the tour there were information points explaining specific parts of the wildlife at Mida Creek.

One of the highlights of the tour was walking across the rope bridge, designed by A Rocha staff in order to get closer to the wildlife, it was clear that the students really enjoyed walking across the swinging bridge, through the Mangrove to get a different view of the surrounding area. All of the students seemed to take a great interest in the environment, with Mida Creek proving to be a great success story in terms of sustainable conservation, with all of the proceeds of the site going towards bursaries for students.

A night at Mida Creek ringing waders about to leave for Asia

The waders (shorebirds) are just about to leave for their breeding grounds in Asia and it’s a very interesting time to collect data from them to understand their migration strategies better. We usually invite volunteers and any guests staying at Mwamba to join us for the night – or part of it. Laura and Jonny, volunteers from England with us for six weeks tell of their experience…

A normal Saturday night for this average British teenager is not usually spent knee deep in Mida Creek with a bird in both hands and dark shadows under my eyes. Yet this is where I found myself on the 4th of April 2009.

The field trip commenced at 4:30pm, battling against the wind to assemble 10 nets, with the aim of catching, ringing and then releasing as many wading birds as possible.

putting nets up at Mida

By sunset the team (Colin, Albert, Ian, Yop, Marika, Jonny, I and later Ruth) were ready and waiting, not just for birds, but also the delivery of supper. At 8:30pm we were joined by Henry and Roni bringing guests, food and most importantly chai (tea brewed together with milk).  Some of the group had a great and wobbly time experiencing the ASSETS boardwalk in the moonlight! A check of the nets at 9:30pm produced four birds (two Terek Sandpipers – both with rings on already that we had ringed them with in 2006 and 2007 – and two Curlew Sandpipers) to ring before the guests left, minus the cushions from the car we had poached for ourselves.

the beautifully up-turned bill of a Terek Sandpiper

By 11pm morale was low. Everyone but CJ was tired, the wind was much stronger than we would have liked, and worst of all we were running out of Milk Chews. But things turned around at midnight with the net round producing 22 waders whose plans for the evening had been disrupted when they found themselves in our research nets! Among these were a bemused Wood Sandpiper:

and an angry Gull-billed Tern. I was informed by those more knowledgeable about birds that this was very exciting! [Ed. the Wood Sand is the first one we’ve ever caught at Mida and is rarely seen there being more of a freshwater bird, and the tern is also uncommon to actually catch though is commonly seen there.]

Colin very chuffed holding the Gull-billed Tern

As we were excitedly transferring our catch from the bird bags to the holding cages, I noticed a bird that looked suspiciously like a Sandpiper sneaking off into the night. There was the sinking realization that one of the three holding cages had a bird-sized hole in it, and that to prevent anymore bids for freedom we would have to store all the birds in the remaining cages. To everyone’s relief, the Wood Sandpiper had not escaped!

After this mini crisis had been resolved, most of the group succumbed to fatigue, and had crashed out in the van, on stools and the ground. It’s amazing how comfortable stone is when you’re exhausted! At 3.30am we were roused by Yop and Marika who were laden with a huge number of wriggling bird bags. They gave us the great news that they needed to go back out to the creek with more bird bags.

Once the nets had been emptied, from 5am we became a human conveyor belt, transferring birds from the holding cages to Colin and Albert who ringed the birds and collected the biometric data whilst Ruth scribed, and then releasing the wobbly and accessorized birds at the edge of the creek. By 9:30am 79 Lesser and Greater Sand Plovers, Grey Plovers, Little Stints, Curlew and Terek Sandpipers, Crab-plovers, Ringed Plovers, a single Common Greenshank

ringing a Crab-plover

Crab-plover ready to go – including with it’s blue colour-ring with white letters that will allow it to be identified by simply readying the letters through a telescope – anyone reading this in the Middle East keep a look out for these birds!

…and even a very unexpected Sedge Warbler (normally found in reed beds or thick scrub – not in the top panel of a wader net several 100m away from the nearest bush or tree!) had been sent back on their way to Mida Creek.

Then the exhausted (apart from CJ!) team loaded up the land cruiser and returned to Mwamba for some well deserved fruit salad and a much needed shower!

Ed: Total tally for the day was 105 birds ringed which is a very reasonable number for a night out. There was some excellent diversity and it was excellent to get a good number of weights of birds many of whom are about to leave on migration and so are really fattening up for the journey.

a Lesser Sandplover

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First Terek Sandpiper ringed in E. Africa to be recovered anywhere – in Finland!

GLOWRY!! This is AWESOME news… I just received this email from the ringing office in Nairobi:

“You’ll be glad to know, Colin, that your Terek Sandpiper, Ring no. “Nairobi A71968″ was controlled, breeding, by Veli-Matti Pakanen at Kemi, Lappi, Finland (65 45’N, 24 32’E) on 21.06.08 (no biometrics supplied). Kemi is a small coastal town at the top end of the Gulf of Bothnia, just over 20 km from the Swedish border at Haparanda.

Apart from the intrinsic worth of this super control, the report also raises some important points. It is the first recovery/control of a Terek Sand affecting eastern Africa and is also only the second recov/control from all the Kenya coastal ringing.”

This was indeed one of “my” birds but was in fact ringed by none other than my “kid sister” Beth Harris (I lived with the Harris family when she was growing up) when she volunteered with us on 20th November 2003 in Mida Creek. The distance in a straight line from Mida to Kemi is c.7,781km and it was 4 1/2 years later that it was found! It was a first year bird when it was ringed (so it hatched in 2003) and so would now be in its 5th year and apparently going strong! If you have google earth access, copy and paste the lat/long into the search field and it’ll take you right there!

This is also more exciting for me / A Rocha Kenya in that it is the FIRST recovery of ANY of my / A Rocha Kenya birds since I started ringing in Kenya in 1994 other than c.2 kms away! Very cool indeed and I’m very stoked about it!!

Wader ringing - the night before A71968 was caught.

This is the scene on the night before the Terek Sand A71968 was caught and ringed… Beth is in fact holding another Terek Sand – she’s sitting in the back of the trusty old Suzuki Jeep we called ‘Spinetail’.

Measuring the head of a Terek Sandpiper

Measuring the head length of a Terek Sandpiper – taking these biometrics help identify populations and can differentiate the sexes in some species.

Erecting nets for wader catching, Mida Creek

This could be the very net that caught the Terek Sandpiper A71968… Beth is helping put it up the evening before we caught it – 19th November 2003… Little did we know!!

Day 3 of the Camp – talks on drugs and saying goodbye

Our last day dawned bright and early with more Morning Glory, breakfast and then an excellent talk from a worker from the local ‘Imani drug rehabilitation Centre.’ He explained the science behind the addiction and how you get hooked and well as the realities of rehab and being strong about avoiding drugs in school and at home. There were many questions from students with some even wanting to talk about other, non-drug related problems.

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Drug Awareness Talk

Our last activity was a trip to Mida Creek. This was a first time for me as well as the students and it was beautiful, despite the intermittent rain when we sheltered under trees!
Students on Walkway at Mida
Students on Walkway at Mida

You may know that A Rocha Kenya as built a hanging walkway through the mangrove forest as an eco-tourism attraction at Mida Creek. It raises money for ASSETS through Tourists coming and paying to use the walkway. Alex and Said, two of the guides, were very knowledgeable about the Mangrove ecosystem and the students had a great time on the walkway!

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Some of the girls with Said at Mida

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Boys outside the bird hide at Mida

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Some of the Students on the Walkway

The camp has now come to an end but the students go away with a wealth of new experiences and information about life, the environment and conservation. Hopefully they have been encouraged to keep on going and their confidence has been increased.

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Lydia, the most active girl

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 John, the most active boy.

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Group photo on steps of Mwamba!